Really? They don’t talk about diet and exercise?

Check out this article about how cancer is being shown to help cancer survivors.  Then, if you care, come back to read my ranting.  http://www.telegram.com/article/20120426/NEWS/120429637/-1/NEWS04

What blows my mind is not that diet and exercise is being shown to help prevent the recurrence of cancer.  I’m not surprised that people use exercise to improve their moods and overcome the depression that can so easily follow such a devastating diagnosis.  I’m not even shocked that the American Cancer Society issued new guidelines (finally).

What I find staggering,  astonishing and even distressing is the comment that “usually the last thing on (a doctor’s) mind is to talk about diet and exercise”.  Really?!  Is that really the case?  Has our medical system really strayed so far from helping people actually overcome disease?  Has it simply become a system where we try to alleviate symptoms rather than alter root causes?

I am not a doctor.  I have no interest in going to medical school.  I did, however, study exercise science and was able to take many of the classes required for pre-med.  I sat in the same room as many people in my area who are now studying to become or are practicing as medical professionals.  I cannot fathom that those people studied what I did, listened to the same lectures, read the same books, prepared presentations on the same topics (on top of everything else they later went through in medical school) and would still have the mentality of diet and exercise being the “last thing on their mind…to talk about” with their patients.

I understand that “there hadn’t been much [statistical] evidence on the effects of diet and exercise for people who had had cancer” but, seriously, how can you work with patient after patient dying from a disease that has long been shown to be tied to obesity and lack of activity and not promote a healthy diet and exercise?

Could you please enlighten me?  Is it really true that doctors don’t help patients with improving their diets and fitness levels?  Has this been your experience or have your doctors talked about diet and exercise?  I am having such a hard time imagining this to really be the case.  What have you experienced?

Remember, the choices you make determine the life you live

Dee’s Banana Nut Muffins ARE GREAT!

It turns out Gaylene doesn’t just do a great job answering phones and taking care of customers around here.  She also has the incredible talent of being able to whip up delicious Dee’s Cereal recipes.
A while back we were looking for something we could use during the in-store demos we do at many of the locations that carry Dee’s Cereal and Gaylene came up with a couple of delectable muffin recipes.  Below is the recipe for my favorite, the banana nut muffin.  You can find this and other recipes on our website under the recipes tab.
You’ll notice Gaylene even put in different sweetener options (honey, sugar, agave, juice concentrate).  You can use any of these depending on your sweetener of choice.  The juice concentrate combination is especially good if you’re watching your sugar intake (such as if you’re baking for someone with diabetes).
This recipe will make 12 regular-size muffins or 48 mini muffins
  • 1 1/2 cups flour, whole wheat (White wheat works best for baking but may be harder to find.  Red wheat will make the muffins too dry.)
  • 3/4 cups Dee’s Cereal
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 egg whites, slightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup skim milk
  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1/2 cup honey, OR 2/3 cup sugar, OR 1/2 cup agave, OR 1/4 cup frozen concentrate pineapple juice and 1/4 cup frozen concentrate apple juice
  • 1/2 cup applesauce unsweetened or, if unsweetened isn’t available, lightly sweetened is OK
  • 1/2 cup puréed white beans (purée the canned beans with their juice – consistency should be like thick paste)
  • 3/4 cup ripe bananas, mashed

Directions:

  1. In a mixing bowl combine flour, Dee’s Cereal, baking soda, baking powder, and if you are using sugar as the sweetener, add it to the flour mixture now.
  2. In a separate bowl combine egg whites, milk, olive oil, applesauce, puréed white beans, and, if you are using one of the other sweeteners add it to the wet mixture now.
  3. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients all at once.
  4. Stir just until moist, batter will be lumpy.
  5. Fold in nuts.
  6. Line muffin tin with paper baking cups or spray muffin tin with nonstick cooking spray.
  7. Fill 2/3 full.
  8. Bake at 375 for 15 to 20 minutes for regular-size muffins or 350 for 10 minutes for mini muffins.

Makes 12 regular muffins or 48 mini muffins.  Serve warm from the oven or make a double batch and freeze some for future use.  Enjoy!

I told you she was good!  These are some of my very favorite muffins.  Hopefully you’ll enjoy them as much as we do.  And hopefully they help lead to healthier snacking and baking options for you and yours.

Remember, the choices you make determine the life you live

National Nutrition Month® is kicking off!

I know.  There’s a month for everything.  According to one website I looked at, January alone has 18 different things it’s the month for.  Crucial things we couldn’t possibly live without celebrating such as “National Prune Breakfast Month” and “National Mail Order Gardening Month”.

(I had an 8th grade health teacher who I’m pretty sure must have been one of the founding members of National Prune Breakfast Month)

If we’re going to take the time to celebrate something, why not take the time to make a month for something that affects us all and can help determine the quality of our lives?  Why not celebrate National Nutrition Month®?  The folks at eatright.org, the website for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics felt the same way.

It started out as National Nutrition Week in March of 1973 and got its own month in 1980.

According to the academy’s website, “The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits”.

Take the challenge.  Decide that for the month of March you will pay more attention to what you are eating and why.  Don’t eat french fries, ice cream, oatmeal, or broccoli until you’ve made a conscious decision to do so and understand what you are eating and why.

Then take it a step further and see if there is a healthier decision you can make that can lead to “developing sound eating…habits”.

Commit to doing it for the month of March.  After that, its ho-hos and ding-dongs all you want.  No, of course not.  But maybe after committing to it for one month it can build habits that will help along to the next step.  Little by little we can all build better habits.

I don’t remember a lot of what my dad has tried to teach me but one thing I can’t forget is that he has always said, “We are creatures of habit”.  He nailed it on that one.

Remember, the choices you make determine the life you live